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who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states. but we do have one. that's pretty of cour pretty p obvious. we have taken too heightly danger of the propaganda in the united states and the extent to which the mosques in the united states can reinforce these attitudes. so it's something that requires a lot more effort on the part of the bureau. >> paul: what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young muslim american to go over to al-qaeda? i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode, because it seems that some of them were radicalized if that is the right word by the invasion by ethiopia of somalia in 2007 that the united states supported. can it be one event like that? >> yes. there are many factors that come into play and there has been excellent studies looking at islamic militants, particularly those in europe. and you do tend to esee a pattern. first, there tends to be something deeply personal that strikes that believer and it r radicalizes him and makes him believe that the muslim community at large, what is almost a virtual
militants who could go violent. we don't have that type of a threat in the united states, but we do have one, i mean, that's pretty obvious and i think we have taken a little bit too lightly, the dangers of islamic militant propaganda in the united states. the extent to which mosques in the united states can reinforce that-- these attitudes. so, it is something that requires a lot more effort, i think, on the part of the bureau. >> what are the triggering episodes that inspire a young, young muslim americans to go over to al-qaeda? and i'm thinking in particular of this recent somali episode because it seems to some of them were radicalized, if that's the right word, by the invasion of ethiopia of somalia in 2007 which the united states supported. can it be just one event just like that? yes, i mean, there are many factors that obviously come into play and there have been some excellent studies looking islamic militants, particularly those affiliated in europe, and you do tend to see a pattern and that first of all, there tends to be, there's something deeply personal that strikes the believ
of the september 11th hijackers and advocated jihad against the united states. and in a stunning change in the legal war on terror, the obama administration announced we'll try the master mind of 9/11, kalid shaikh mohammed and four others from guantanamo in a court in new york city. what's behind this decision and is it possible they will be acquitted? joining us columnist dan ettinger, editorial board member, dorothy rabid wits. >> everything in his life, that pointed to this, he said outrageous things at long lectures and the response was we have to let him do his things. >> at walter reed hospital. >> at walter reed and people sent him to of all things, school. they sent him to a university lecture place, he would be responsible to this. he carried a card that said soldier of islam we now discover. he-- >> people are seeing all of this. why didn't anybody blow the whistle? >> look, what's really happened is americans are not going to forget this happened. cowardess prevented anyone from interfering, the only word to use, drop political correctness. >> cowardess on who's part? >> on
jihad against the united states. and in a stunning change in the legal war on terror, the obama administration announced that it will try the mastermind of 9/11, khalid sheikh mohammed and four other enemy combatants at guantanamo in criminal court in new york city. what is behind this decision and is it possible they could be acquitted? joining the panel, "wall street journal" columnist and deputy editor dann henniger, editorial board member dorothy and columnist bill magurn. dorothy, was hasan a terrornist plain sight? why didn't people see that? >> the last question first. he was apparently. everything his life pointed to this, he said outrageous things at long lectures and the response was we have to let him do his thing. >> paul: this is a presentation at walter reed. >> walter reed hospital. and then people sent him to of all things school. sent him to a university lecture place, he would be responsive to this. he carried a card that said, "soldier of islam" we now discover. he seethed with hatred. >> paul: people are seeing all of this. why didn't anybody blow the whist w
the job of the president of the united states? >> i believe that i am, but that's not to say that i'm putting myself out there to campaign or anything else. >> no not to say that, but you believe that you're smart enough, incisive enough, intellectual enough to handle the most powerful job in the world? do you believe that? >> i believe that i am because i have common sense and i have, i believe, the values that are reflective of so many other american values. >> joining the panel this week wall street journal editorial riley and kim strassel, to you first. do you think that sarah palin now looks presidential? >> well, i'm less concerned about her qualifications per se for being president and more interested in the question of whether she's the right to beat barack obama in 2012. if as we're told by the polesters, republicans need to win back these independent voters, that they lost to obama last year, is she the right person to do that? and we don't have a huge sample here to go by, but we do have the elections earlier this month. we had two republican gubernatorial candidates, one
chamber of the congress of the united states. as you can see right now the representatives are voting on a landmark $1.2 trillion healthcare reform bill. that as i said an hour ago is noteworthy because you think it holds the promise of universal coverage or virtual universal coverage for all american force you feel that way, it's do to be condemned because it represents a government takeover of the entire healthcare system. that depending on your political point of view. you can see, this is on passage. yeas, 177, nays 156. the key number is 218. when the yeas reach 218, they'll have representatives and as you can see, there is not a single republican vote, but if they get 218 democratic votes then the house of representatives will have carried the omnibus healthcare reform bill. so the incendiary debate that ignited town hall meeting all across our country this summer and caused widespread anxiety that president obama was trying to do too much is about to reach the critical milestone after months of political maneuvering with this vote at 195 to 178 on compromise bill, that as we sa
, but eventually their health care systems are now more affordable than the united states. >> yeah, their countries are bankrupt. quickly to quentin's point about businesses, you can become an entrepreneur, that takes, now, that ignores the fact that the health reform bill has an insurance mandate, an 8% payroll tax. if you become an entrepreneur and you can't afford to insure your workers which is had an an insurance mandate is. if you're an individual entrepreneur you have to pay tax-- >> look at leo, waiting to be called on. neil, go ahead. in this system i don't want to be a patient, but this is like digging holes and filling them in. nothing to say that this is going to get its arms around our real problem. this is bad for the economy? >> twice as much as our competitors as other industrialized competitors on our health care and this is not going to reduce the cost, this is not going to make us a more competitive society and there's nothing to say that this is really going to improve our health. >> and in fact, is that 2000 pages, that's what they're debating right now, 2000 pages and there ar
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7